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NASA Finds Perfectly Rectangular Iceberg In Antarctica As If It Was Deliberately Cut

Sometimes you see an image that’s pretty hard to believe it is not a poor attempt at Photoshop. This is one of those images. On Twitter, NASA’s ICE team responsible for polar research posted a bizarre picture showing an iceberg that was almost a perfect rectangle. The image was taken by NASA’s Operation IceBridge, a fleet of research aircraft that image Earth’s polar ice.

Measuring 295 kilometers (183 miles) long and 37 kilometers (23 miles) across, it was spotted breaking from the Ross Ice Shelf in Antarctica in March 2000. The clean edges of this latest iceberg suggest it was created (calved) pretty recently, notes Science Alert. Over time, the sea and wind will start to erode its smooth edges.

But it’s a pretty neat look at how these icebergs can take all sorts of shapes, even seemingly regular ones that don’t look real at all. This isn’t the only iceberg news we’ve been treated to lately. Last month, scientists captured on film the moment that a huge iceberg broke from a glacier in eastern Greenland. Capture images and videos like this enables us to track the effect climate change is having on the planet.

That iceberg was also a wide and flat tabular iceberg, accompanied by smaller tall and thin chunks of ice called pinnacle icebergs. Tabular icebergs also often crack and fall apart, perhaps through a collision, forming a less regular shape. Just remember though, next time you see a weirdly rectangular iceberg, your eyes do not deceive you. Even if it looks pretty darn weird.